New & Latest Arrivals – 17/02/2014

Despite the cold, the month of February has been such a pleasure so far. Readings from the terrific writers  Kevin Barry, Christine Miscione and Stuart Ross have come and gone, with more on the way: David McGimpsey and Jason Camlot will be gracing the podium of the Atwater Poetry Project soon enough and we’ll be there with books in tow.

Here are the newest and latest arrivals for the halfway point through February: Books for our Literature, Philosophy, Social Sciences and  Criticism & Theory sections, plus one excellent title for the kids. Points of interest include work from Arkady & Boris Strugatsky (whose sci-fi work Roadside Picnic was adapted by Tarkovsky for the film Stalker), new paperback editions of great 2013 titles, great criticism and theory from Umberto Eco and Canadian poet Zachariah Wells, and a new book of historical essays out from Open Letter BooksEurope in Sepia by Dubravka Ugresic.

Click the title of a book to view information on or a review of that title, or just search for them in our catalogue (recommended for price checks).

NEW & LATEST ARRIVALS

 

FICTION

 

POETRY

 

PHILOSOPHY, SOCIAL SCIENCES & HISTORY

 

CRITICISM & THEORY

 

KIDS

 

What are we reading these days? We’ve all been enjoying some die-hard and not-so-die-hard-but-should-be classics at the shop. Gap Boo’s enjoying the poetry of Charles Bukowski with the collection You Get So Alone At Times That It Makes Sense, a great example of “Bukowski writing the same thing over and over, and you just don’t get tired of it.” Eric is reading the first book of the Illuminatus! Trilogy: “It’s just wild. It’s fantastic, man, so crazy… every chapter just keeps topping itself. What started as a bizarre mystery tale is, by the end of the first book, a scifi novel about people fighting sea monsters.” Meg is adding to her list of the Steinbeck novels she’s read with a beautiful Penguin Modern Classics edition of East of Eden, and JP is is being driven slightly mad by The Tutu by Léon Genonceaux, a book (as mentioned when it came in) seldomly purported as the strangest novel of the 19th century.

 

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